Benjamin Lumb
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HOLLYBURN FERRY

Before the Lions Gate Bridge was built, a ferry service provided the most direct route between Vancouver and West Vancouver, British Columbia. Operating from 1909 to 1947, it carried 100,000 passengers a month at its peak in the 1930s. The fleet’s largest vessel was the 109-foot MV Hollyburn, with room for 200 inside and another 130 outside. After sinking in 2009, the ship was salvaged by Paul Palmer. While motionless now, the 600-pound propeller has been given a permanent pattern, evocative of its past life, and in its current state, stories will continue to cross overhead.  

 Hollyburn Ferry propeller and shaft (c. 1936) stainless steel, glass - 1050 lbs $20,000

Hollyburn Ferry propeller and shaft (c. 1936) stainless steel, glass - 1050 lbs
$20,000

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 “These boats were never put on to make money,” he said. “They are a road to West Vancouver, and the most beautiful scenic road in the world. You don’t expect Marine Drive to turn a profit, do you?”  - Engineer, Harry Thompson

“These boats were never put on to make money,” he said. “They are a road to West Vancouver, and the most beautiful scenic road in the world. You don’t expect Marine Drive to turn a profit, do you?”

- Engineer, Harry Thompson

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 For inquiries please  contact  the Artist.

For inquiries please contact the Artist.